Today I learned something interesting about pointer-events and Chrome (from what I can tell, anyway).

Let’s say you have a button set up like this:

<button>
  <span aria-hidden="true"><svg ... /></span>
  <span class="visuallyhidden">Button text</span>
</button>

I do this kind of thing when I want to have an icon in a button. A common use case is a social sharing button.

Let’s say you want to have a click event on the button, but it won’t work if the <span> registers the click, so you do something like this:

button span {
  pointer-events: none;
}

Oddly enough, in Chrome, the click event will still register with the span. This seems to be because pointer-events: none is being used on a inline element (in this case, a <span>).

You can do one of two things, then. Either swap the <span> for a block element like a <div>:

<button>
  <div aria-hidden="true"><svg ... /></div>
  <span class="visuallyhidden">Button text</span>
</button>

OR, my preferred solution, add a display property to the CSS rule

button span {
  display: inline-block; /* block also works */
  pointer-events: none;
}